Directory

Jason Hong is an associate professor in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute, part of the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He works in the areas of usability, mobility, privacy, and security. His research lies at the intersection of human-computer interaction, privacy and security, and systems, focusing primarily on two questions:

  • How can we use rich sensor data to improve our lives?
  • How can we make privacy and security easier for everyone?

Hong’s research group is CHIMPS (Computer Human Interaction: Mobility Privacy Security). The group’s work has been featured in CNN, The New York Times, and BBC.

Office
3523 Newell Simon Hall
Phone
412.268.1251
Fax
412.268.1266
Email
jasonh@cs.cmu.edu
Google Scholar
Jason Hong
Websites
Jason Hong

Education

2005 Ph.D. in Computer Science, University of California at Berkeley

1997 B.S. in Discrete Mathematics, Georgia Institute of Technology

1997 B.S. in Computer Science, Georgia Institute of Technology

Affiliations

Media mentions


CyLab Security and Privacy Institute

Jin receives 2020 UbiComp Outstanding Student Award

Haojian Jin, a fifth year Ph.D. student, received the Gaetano Borriello Outstanding Student Award during the virtual UbiComp 2020 awards ceremony.

Popular Mechanics

Hong quoted on privacy and security

CyLab’s Jason Hong was quoted in Popular Mechanics on privacy and security in vacation rentals.

CyLab Security and Privacy Institute

Shedding light (and sound) on hidden IoT devices in your next hotel room

In a new study, a team of CyLab researchers explored different locator designs to make IoT devices seem a little less hidden.

CyLab Security and Privacy Institute

Privacy perceptions of contact-tracing apps

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University examined user preferences on six different contact-tracing app designs after explaining the risks and benefits of each option.

WESA

Hong and Carley on contact tracing apps

CyLab’s Jason Hong and Kathleen Carley were quoted by WESA discussing the pros and cons of contact tracing apps to investigate cases of COVID-19.

CyLab Security and Privacy Institute

This new tool for developers can help preserve app users’ privacy

A team of CyLab researchers created a tool that nudges developers to think a bit harder about user privacy when coding data requests.

Pittsburgh Business Times

Panat, Goyal, and Hong discuss cybersecurity with PBT

CyLab’s Rahul Panat, Vipul Goyal, and Jason Hong were recently quoted by Pittsburgh Business Times about the cybersecurity projects they are working on. Believing that blockchain can help secure the energy grid, Panat and Goyal are planning to create a complete prototype of the eight-node blockchain system. Meanwhile, Hong is designing an IoT Hub prototype, a system that would manage the security of all IoT devices in a home or business.

CyLab Security and Privacy Institute

First round of Secure and Private IoT Initiative funded projects announced

CyLab’s Secure and Private IoT Initiative (IoT@CyLab) has broken ground as the first round of funded proposals have been announced. Twelve selected projects will be funded for one year, and results will be presented at the IoT@CyLab annual summit next year.

CyLab Security and Privacy Institute

Eight Carnegie Mellon faculty and staff spoke at this week's RSA Conference

Carnegie Mellon had a big showing at this week's RSA Conference in San Francisco with eight faculty and staff members from across the university spoke about topics ranging from security and human behavior to the security of robot-produced code.

CMU Engineering

Creating shape-aware surfaces

WiSh, a shape-sensing technology, could shape how we interact with virtual reality and how we create smart cities.

Chicago Tribune

Hong quoted on privacy in apps

The Chicago Tribune interviewed CyLab’s Jason Hong on ensuring privacy on apps.

CyLab Security and Privacy Institute

Understanding the cybersecurity grapevine

When people get word of an online data breach, men are far more likely to share that news with their colleagues and women are much more likely to share it with family and significant others, CyLab researchers report.